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AWS Launches Honeycode, A Mobile And Web App Creation Software That Needs No Coding

Amazon Web Services recently announced the beta for the new Amazon Honeycode, a fully managed minimal coding development system that lets business to make their own applications without having to put in the resources for coding.

The Honeycode system allows for developers to build 20 free applications, with additional fees per user and storage after those first 20 apps.

For those looking to check it out, Amazon lets people access the system with ease. AWS VP Larry Augustin stated that customers told the company that the need for custom applications is overwhelming the development capacity, which is why they made Honeycode, to give people the chance to make custom mobile and web apps without having to deal with the coding.

Honeycode, like a lot of other available tools, provide templates for users, so they can handle the common things like to-do list applications, surveys, schedules, and the like. Traditionally, AWS says, a lot of businesses use spreadsheets to handle these tasks.

AWS released an announcement when they launched the beta, telling people to go to their site and check it out, while also explaining the problem with spreadsheets. According to the statement, people prefer custom applications due to the fact that spreadsheets are static, leaving them unable to scale, and prone to versioning and data syncing errors thanks to the fact that it tends to be passed along via e-mail, which has its own issues on top of what spreadsheets already have.

Naturally, to ease the whole creation process, Honeycode based its core data interface on spreadsheets, complete with spreadsheet-style formulas, which is about the closest to coding the service actually gets to, which is useful for Honeycode’s users, which AWS termed as ‘builders’. On top of that, ‘builders’ can also set approval workflows, reminders, and notifications.

AWS states that the databases made in Honeycode can handle up to 100,000 rows for every workbook, which they argue allows for users to focus on actually working on the applications without having to deal with all the hassle of making the supporting infrastructure.

Honeycode is still in development, with only people in US able to utilize it, having started beta testing in Oregon before spreading to other regions in the country.