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Google Switching Entirely To Mobile-First Indexing

In the modern age, a business can live or die by its online presence, and that’s why things like King Kong SEO are given such importance. Changes happen regularly which, in turn, facilitates regular updates, and companies have to keep track of that.

Google’s recent announcement is a notable change for the company, and a call to action for the internet, as the tech giant known primarily for its search engine has announced that it’ll be switching to mobile-first indexing before the end of 2020.

On a blog post on the Official Google Webmaster Central Blog, Google announced that it will be completing the switch to mobile-first indexing by September 2020. The statement is the culmination of the company’s work to adapt to the increasing popularity of mobile devices for use in browsing the internet, with the switch having started in 2016.

The blog post by the company, released by Google Zurich Developer Advocated John Mueller, explained that when a domain is switched to mobile-first indexing, it’ll see an increase in the crawls done by Googlebot as Google works to update their index to the mobile version. Naturally, this might take a bit depending on the domain itself. The traditional desktop Googlebot will still do crawls, but most of Google’s crawling past September 2020 will be handled by the mobile smartphone user-agent, which, naturally, will lead to changes with King Kong SEO and the like.

Google reports that, according to their analysis, the majority of sites that show up in their search results are ready for mobile-first indexing, with 70% having already made the changes. Those that haven’t taken the necessary steps for mobile-first indexing have received a notice from Google informing them of any indexing issues that they detect on the sites.

The announcement effectively puts a deadline on sites looking to get ready for mobile-first indexing, as they need to get the issues ironed out before September 2020 or end up suffering a huge hit to their SEO. Google, for their part, offered some advice for sites, including avoiding separate mobile URLs (m-dots) due to the issues and confusion that can, and has popped up from this.

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